SERGE

  1. en.wikipedia.org
    The Byzantine Empire was the predominantly Greek-speaking continuation of the Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul), originally known as Byzantium. Initially the eastern half of the Roman Empire (often called the Eastern Rom…
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  2. Ancient Greek – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org
    Ancient Greek is the form of Greek used during the periods of time spanning the 9th – 6th century BC, (known as Archaic), the 5th – 4th century BC (Classical), and the 3rd century BC – 6th century AD (Hellenistic) in ancient Greece and the ancient world. It was predated in the 2nd millennium BC by M…
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  3. Old French – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org
    Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern Frenchancien français) was the Romancedialect continuum spoken in territories that span roughly the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from the 9th century to the 14th century. It was then (14th century) collectiv…
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  4. Charlemagne – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org
    Charlemagne (/ˈʃɑrlɨmeɪn/; 2 April 742/747/748[1] – 28 January 814), also known as Charles the Great (German: Karl der Große;[2]Latin: Carolus or Karolus Magnus) or Charles I, was the King of the Franks from 768, the King of Italy from 774, and from 800 the first emperor in western Europe since the…
  5. Serge – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    en.wikipedia.org
    Serge is a type of twillfabric that has diagonal lines or ridges on both sides, made with a two-up, two-down weave. The worsted variety is used in making military uniforms, suits, great coats and trench coats. Its counterpart, silk serge, is used for linings. French serge is a softer, finer variety….
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